Login    Forum    Search    FAQ

Board index » Upgrading and Repairing Forum » Windows OS




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Creating an updated WinXP install disc
 Post Posted: Wed Feb 06, 2008 3:50 am 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Sun Feb 04, 2007 11:44 am
Posts: 6171
The main tools I use to produce updated Windows XP install discs are:

The DriverPacks include their own integration tool, but the RyanVM update pack requires a separate tool to integrate the pack into the installation source. You can use either the RyanVM Integrator http://siginetsoftware.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=9 *or* nLite http://nliteos.com to integrate the RyanVM Post SP2 Update Pack.

These two programs can even be combined in various ways, although in general it is best to stick with one or the other. For best results, do the DriverPack integration last, after all other updates and/or changes are made to the install source. Then go back to the RyanVM Integrator or nLite to take the updated source files and create the bootable ISO (CD/DVD image) or just burn the disc directly.

In the video DVD included with my upcoming URWindows 2nd edition book, I show step-by-step exactly how to create an updated Windows XP install disc, including post-SP2 updates, hotfixes and drivers. As part of the process I demonstrate using nLite and the BTS DriverPacks.

Until that book/DVD is released (another month or so), check out the following tutorials:


For additional support, check out the RyanVM, nLite, and DriverPacks forums. Scott.


Top 
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Testing of RyanVM Update Pack
 Post Posted: Sun Mar 02, 2008 6:36 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 2:35 am
Posts: 53
Location: Los Angeles, CA
I believe Scott would tell you from the e-mails we've exchanged that I'm someone who often gets into the detailed facts about certain things I happen to become interested in. As an example, and something I think Scott and others would like to know, I recently ran Ryan's integrator on two different occasions of the same day to see what, if any, differences would show up and to check the time it took for each to complete. Here are the results:

The "Total Integration Time" was 2352 seconds for the first and 2347 seconds for the second; essentially the same time; about 39 minutes on my old 1.0 GHz AMD Athlon box. By checking the log files for both sessions, their output lines were found to be the same; except for the times of course.

By searching the whole /I386 folder for each session for only those files which the integrator had actually updated, and then comparing all of them (using some digital tools). Of all the files the Integrator altered during each session, I found only 3 files which differed from each other: MMSSETUP.CAB, SVCPACK.IN_ and SYSOC.IN_. By meticulously comparing each of these files, I found that only the bytes which represented some time stamps in the last two had understandably changed, and in MMSSETUP.CAB these were the exact resluts:

Code:
Differences in two successive sessions using the same VM Pack for the MMSSETUP.CAB file (both were the same size, 911,104 bytes):

Column 1. Second  session.
Column 2. For First session.

Offset in hexadecimal
------  1    2

 38:   CE   E1
 39:   58   50
 55:   CE   E1
 56:   58   50
 72:   CE   E1
 73:   58   50
 8D:   CE   E1
 8E:   58   50
 A6:   CE   E1
 A7:   58   50
 C2:   CE   E1
 C3:   58   50
 DD:   CE   E1
 DE:   58   50
 F8:   CE   E1
 F9:   58   50
112:   CE   E1
113:   58   50
12F:   CE   E1
130:   58   50


In each instance above, these are also merely some form of 'time stamp' for the files contained inside this single *.CAB file.

Thus, the RyanVM Integrator appears to be consistent in the functions it carries out.


Top 
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
 Post Posted: Sun Mar 02, 2008 7:05 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Sun Feb 04, 2007 11:44 am
Posts: 6171
When I run the integrator the entire process only takes between 500 to 600 seconds on my R60 laptop. Scott.


Top 
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
 Post Posted: Wed Mar 12, 2008 2:32 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 2:35 am
Posts: 53
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Scott,

That just shows how much faster your computer is than mine, right? This one is an old AMD 1GHz. What are you running?


Top 
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
 Post Posted: Mon Mar 17, 2008 11:59 am 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Sun Feb 04, 2007 11:44 am
Posts: 6171
I do integrations on my R60 laptop, which has 2GB of DDR2 PC2-5300 RAM and an Intel Core 2 Duo T7200: http://processorfinder.intel.com/detail ... Spec=SL9SL

I have the integrator configured to copy my clean XP w/SP2 source to a separate destination directory, then do the integration on the destination. This keeps my source clean, but increases the integration time by the amount of time necessary to copy 376MiB.

My laptop did the complete source copy and integration in only 556 seconds using the RVM Integrator 1.5.1 and the Post-SP2 Update Pack 2.2.1: http://integrator.siginetsoftware.com/i ... p?download

You can speed up integration somewhat by pre-compressing files in *.cab format using the CVTAddon tool: http://www.ryanvm.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=4418

On my system, converting the Post-SP2 pack alone from *.7z to *.cab format improved integration time by 30 seconds. To save more time (and space), I reduced the size of my XP/SP2 source to only 376MiB by deleting the following (unnecessary) folders:

    In the root: DOCS, VALUEADD, and SUPPORT - frees up 22.3MiB
    In the root: CMPNENTS - frees up 25.2MiB
    In I386: WIN9XMIG, WIN9XUPG and WINNTUPG - frees up 37.6MiB
    In I386: LANG - frees up 99MiB

A full integration of the Post-SP2 pack took only 651 seconds the last time I did it, and that was on a very slow external USB drive.

After this integration, I normally use the http://driverpacks.net to add the MassStorage, Chipset, CPU, LAN and WLAN driver packs to the source, then go back to the RVM Integrator to make the ISO, which I then burn to a physical disc using http://imgburn.com

Scott.


Top 
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
 Post Posted: Mon Mar 17, 2008 2:45 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 2:35 am
Posts: 53
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Good info Scott. Yeah, I'm sure a dual core even if it were at the same speed as my old Athlon CPU would zoom past it! If I was assembling new PCs for a living, even working for someone else, I'd def. have some 'handmade' install CDs to burn using all the 'hints' you described. Anyone with a company involved in such activities is throwing away money if they don't find out how to reasonably shave lots of time off the process!

For the average Geek of course, this is more for fun than profit though, and making sure our own home computers perform as best as possible is often much more important than however long it takes getting there. (E.g., it may be over a week longer until I can finally get a WinXP install to run correctly under AHCI/RAID.)


Top 
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
 
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 

Board index » Upgrading and Repairing Forum » Windows OS


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests

 
 

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron